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Posts published in “Day: February 8, 2022

Houston Mayor announces $44 million “One Safe Houston”

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner announces “One Safe Houston” at a news conference last week.

HOUSTON – Mayor Sylvester Turner has announced “One Safe Houston: the Mayor’s Public Safety Initiative to Combat Violent Crime,” which focuses on four key areas:

–Violence Reduction and Crime Prevention

–Crisis Intervention, Response and Recovery

–Youth Outreach Opportunities

–Key Community Partnerships.

The plan outlines a commitment to put more officers on the streets through overtime and cadet classes and creates a $1 million gun buyback program. It also provides $1.5 million in additional funding to the Houston Forensic Science Center to address backlogs and funds domestic violence programs with an additional $3 million to provide more services for survivors and prevention efforts.

“This plan represents a holistic approach to combatting violent crime on the streets while being responsive to the needs of victims and building healthier communities in the process,” said Mayor Turner. “Law enforcement efforts alone will not sufficiently address the symptoms of crime. We are faced with a public health crisis, and it will require all of us, working together to overcome it.”

Mayor Turner also announced:

Harris County allocates $50mil for “Clean Streets, Safe Neighborhoods”

Judge Lina Hidalgo with Sheriff’s deputies to announce the new “Clean Streets, Safe Neighborhoods” program.

HARRIS COUNTY – County Judge Lina Hidalgo and Precinct 2 Commissioner Adrian Garcia announced a Major Crime Prevention and Neighborhood Safety Initiative. The Proposed $50 million smart on crime program is to target areas with high rates of violent crime driven by gun violence.

Judge Lina Hidalgo revealed details of the new $50 million proposal to prevent violent crime and improve neighborhood safety across Harris County. The new initiative will target distressed county neighborhoods where blight and neglect are driving violent crime. The program will improve street lighting, sidewalks, and visibility in residential areas, address longstanding blighted and abandoned structures, restore vacant lots, and implement other improvements shown to enhance public safety.

During Judge Hidalgo’s tenure, commissioners court has increased the law enforcement budgets for every law enforcement agency, including the district attorney’s office, by 13% since 2019. This brings the total funding for law enforcement in fiscal year 2022 alone to $966 million.

Aldine ISD Celebrates Black History Month

Schools across the district will celebrate the culture, traditions, and contributions of African Americans.

Aldine ISD will be celebrating Black History Month throughout the month of February.

Black History Month celebrates the achievements of African Americans and recognizes the prominent role of African Americans in U.S. history. Black History Month, created by American Historian Carter G. Woodson, originally began as Negro History Week. Since 1976, every U.S. President has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month. Black History Month is also celebrated in Canada and the United Kingdom.

Notable figures highlighted during Black History Month are Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who fought for equal rights in the 50s and 60s; Mae Jemison, the first female African American astronaut to travel to space; John Lewis, an American politician and civil rights activist who served on the House of Representatives; and Kamala Harris, the first female vice president of the United States, as well as the first African American and Asian American vice president.

This year, the national Black History Month theme focuses on the importance of Black Health and Wellness. This theme acknowledges the legacy of not only Black scholars and medical practitioners in Western medicine, but also other ways of knowing (e.g., birthworkers, doulas, midwives, naturopaths, herbalists, etc.). Additionally, it focuses on the importance of taking care of oneself — both physically and mentally. Initiatives to help decrease disparities have provided several outcomes, including having more diverse practitioners and representation in all segments of the medical and health fields.

Dealing with COVID-19 in a New Year

County Connection by Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo

A new year is a time for new beginnings, and I know we are all ready to start fresh. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 epidemic has not slowed down over the holidays. With the emergence of the Omicron strain fueling the fire, a new wave of infections are once again raising our numbers. Hospitalizations are slowly rising and approaching problematic levels, infections are spreading rapidly across our County, and this week our numbers have pushed our threat level back to red. The possible exposures from travel, holiday celebrations, and gatherings on top of the return of children to school this week could trigger a very difficult month ahead in terms of hospitalizations and the strain on our medical system. It is clear that we will be living with this virus indefinitely.

But here in Harris County we are not giving in – we have more tools available and more knowledge on this virus than at any previous point during this pandemic. And we know that vaccinations are the best protection for you and your family against this virus. If there has ever been a wake up call to get vaccinated and get your booster, that time is now. You can find all the information you need on how and where to get vaccinated and your booster at readyharris.org.